skip navigation

Too / Either

Adding a positive or negative comment

children awaiting new school

 

 

 

 

Too/ Either

AND…TOO AND…NOT EITHER

After mentioning a positive idea or fact, add another positive comment with and… too.    (conjunctive expression)

After mentioning a negative idea or fact, add another negative comment with and… not either.  (conjunctive expression)

POSITIVE

I am eight today, and my cousin is too.    

NEGATIVE

I am not a child, and my cousin isn't either.    

I am waiting for our new school to open, and my cousin is too.      (present)

I am not worrying, and my cousins aren't either.    

I have a new reader (book), and my classmates do too / have too  (Br-Eng)

I don't have a desk, and my classmates don't either/ haven't either (Br-Eng)

I wished for a new school, and my parents did too.  (past) 

I didn't want to be uneducated, and my friends didn't either.  

I will work very hard, and my classmates will too.  (modal verb)
 

I won't be late, and my classmates won't either

Too / Either (adv.) — See Adv for Focus.

 

 

 

 

Too / Either

Polarity

 

 

Positive and Negative Responses in Agreement

A POSITIVE STATEMENT A NEGATIVE STATEMENT

A sentence with a positive verb is "positive" even if the meaning is negative. We use too when adding a comment of agreement to the following:

A sentence with a negative verb is "negative" even if the meaning is positive. We use either when adding a comment of agreement to the following:

POSITIVE VERB – POSITIVE MEANING

I like this book, and he does too.

NEGATIVE VERB – POSITIVE MEANING

I can't help reading this book, and he can't either.   like, can't stop      

I look forward to beginning school, and my friends do too.
 

I can't wait to begin school, and she can't either.   eagerly anticipate, look forward to 

POSITIVE VERB – NEGAITIVE MEANING

I dislike this book, and they do too.

NEGATIVE VERB – NEGATIVE MEANING

I can't stand reading this book, and she can't either.  dislike      

I avoid / detest watching that movie, and they do too.

I can't bear watching that movie again, and I can't either.   cannot tolerate  
 

POSITIVE ADVERB – POSITIVE MEANING

They truly believe what he is saying, and I do too.  (always, usually, mostly, never / totally, utterly, completely / confidently, assuredly, reasonably, logically)
 

NEGATIVE ADVERB – NEGATIVE MEANING

They hardly believe what he is saying, and I don't either(seldom, rarely, never / barely, scarcely)
 

POSITIVE PRONOUN – POSITIVE MEANING

Everyone believes me, he does too.

NEGATIVE PRONOUN – NEGATIVE MEANING

No one believes me, and he doesn't either.   (nobody, not any one, none of them, not one person, hardly anyone) 
 

 

 

 

 

 

Too / Either

Short responses

 

 

 

Short Responses of Agreement

TOO NOT EITHER

We can use too to add a comment of agreement after someone makes a positive statement.

We can use either to add a comment of agreement after someone makes a negative statement.

POSITIVE

I am excited.  (be verb)

 

Me too (informal)
I am too!
He is too!
They are too!

NEGATIVE

I am not worried.

 

Me either (informal)
I am not either!
He isn't either!
They aren't either!

I have a backpack.   (have verb)

backpack (n.) – book bag

Me too (informal)
I do too!     (Br. Eng. have too)
He does too!   (Br. Eng. has too)
They do too!    (Br. Eng. have too)

I do not have a backpack.

Me either (informal)
I don't either!     (Br. Eng. haven't either)
He doesn't either! (Br. Eng. hasn't either)
They don't either(Br. Eng. haven't either)

I would like a desk.   (modal verb)

Me too (informal)
I would too!
He would too!
They would too!

I would not like to sit on the floor.

Me either (informal)
I wouldn't either!
He wouldn't either!
They wouldn't either!

I hoped for a new school.   (past verb)

Me too
I did too.
He did too.
They did too.

I did not like the old one.

Me either (informal)
I didn't either.
He didn't either.
They didn't either.

Me too (informal speech) – is more commonly used in a present, immediate context, less commonly for an activity or action in the past.

 

 

 

 

But Not Too

Indicating restrictions

 

 

 

But… Not…Too

BUT NOT TOO EITHER X or Y 

After mentioning a positive idea or fact, we can add a negative point using but  not…too.

We can offer a choice between two items with either X or Y. "Select one".

You can take a cookie, but you can't take a cupcake too

You can take either a cookie or a cupcake.  (a choice of one item)

He's drinking a lot, but at least he isn't driving too.

You can either drink or drive as much as you like. (a choice of one activity)

You can have your cake, but you can't eat it too.

You can either have your cake or you can eat it. (a choice of one activity
 

"You can't have your cake and eat it too." (expression) – You have to make choices in life.

 

 

 

 

Common Mistakes

Errors and Solutions

 

 

 

ERROR SOLUTION

I'm not going, and he isn't going neither.     

I'm not going, and he isn't either.     (Also see neither…nor)

"I thought he was dead." 
"Me too."

"I thought he was dead.." 
"I did too."   We tend to use me too in a present, immediate context. (Me too is informal.)

I can't wait for the opening, and they can't too / also / as well.  (verb + not)

I can't wait for the opening, and they can't either.
Use either after a verb with not: can't help, can't wait, can't stand, can't bear.

"I can hardly believe my eyes! "   (negative adverb)
"Me too." 

"I can hardly believe my eyes! "
"Me either." (informal)  "I can't either. (neg. can+hardly = can+not)
Use either after a negative adverb: hardly, barely, seldom, rarely, never.

"No one helped me."   (negative pronoun)
"Me too."

"No one helped me."
"Me either."
 Use either after a negative pronoun: no one, nobody, not one person, none of them
 

 

 

 

 

Practice 1

Storytelling

Narrating

 

 

 

Adding a point of agreement

  1. Select the response from the list that best completes the sentence. 
  2. Compare your response to the feedback by clicking the "check" button.

 

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

 

 

 

 

 

Practice 2

Setting limits (rules)

Setting Rules

 

 

 

  1. Select the response from the list that best completes the sentence. 
  2. Compare your response to the feedback by clicking the "check" button.

 

11.

12.

13.

14.


see (v.) - to visit

15.

16.

17.


allowance (n.) – a weekly or monthly amount of money that is given to a child to teach him or her how to spend wisely as well as save.

18.


19.

20.

make two trips (expression) – go once, return, go again